Determinants of Educational Attainments among Muslim Community in Kerala State of India: Role of Family Background and Gender

SREEKALA EDANNUR, PK Afsal

Abstract


Education of Muslim minority in India has been an important topic of research for academics and policy makers post-independence. Muslims are considered as a minority in India and their socio-economic condition is reported, in some instances, as lower than even the SCs who are the victims of a long standing caste system. This research investigates how well the following family background factors: fathers’ education, mothers’ education, fathers’ occupation, parents’ income and gender explains the variations in educational attainment of Muslim children in Kerala. The analysis used data from 431 randomly selected Muslim respondents, 231 males and 200 females, aged 25-40 years from 24 election wards of 10 panchayats and one municipality. Respondents aged 25-40 years were selected from the socio-economic caste census 2011 data. Data was collected through interview method using interview schedule. A multinomial logistic model is fitted to the dependent variable educational attainment by measuring level of education in four categories. The result showed that all the family background factors were significantly predicting the educational attainment of children except the factor parental income. In the present study, fathers’ education and mothers’ education are found predicting their children’s higher education significantly. Fathers’ occupation significantly predicted whether their children went to higher higher education, specifically at post-graduate level.  One important findings from the study is that fathers’ income is not significantly predicting the educational attainments of children. The educational implications for policy decisions are discussed and recommendations are spelt.


References


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